Flavors range anywhere from chocolate or strawberry to graham cracker or red velvet cake. Athletes and bodybuilders focus on consuming lots of protein each day, so, naturally, they enjoy a little variety when it comes to protein shakes. Muscle Milk is only one of hundreds of different brands of protein supplement providers. Most of the brands have traditional flavors, like vanilla and chocolate, but from there, imagination takes over as each brand develops more and more flavors of the powder. The price of a five pound bucket of protein powder ranges anywhere from $30 to $80, but many popular brands settle somewhere in the $50 range. A New York Times article reported protein supplement industry revenue in 2008 was at $2.7 billion—a number that likely falls short of 2012 revenue as supplementing is welcomed into the mainstream. Supplementing and healthy dieting has always been a part of bodybuilding, but effective marketing and study has brought more and more everyday athletes into the mix.
*Snippet by: Tayler Tanner
August 24, 2013
Funnel cakes are served at many state fairs and county events. They have a unique, snake-like design in which thin streams of batter intertwine to make a fancy looking cake. These cakes are created by pouring a thin batter into a funnel which then is drizzled into a pan of hot oil. The thin lines of batter grow and form together to make the cake. The funnel gives the cake the unique, snaky design. Once it is golden browned it is flipped over and browned on the other side until cooked through. Afterward the delicious cake is powdered with sugar or topped with fruit or jam, or even whipped cream!
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*Snippet by: Tiffany
August 24, 2013
“Ground Zero” was first used during WWII when the atomic bomb was being developed. During this process they decided to call the point of detonation “ground zero.” While testing the atomic bomb they titled the area “Zero.” When the city of Hiroshima was destroyed in the explosion of the atomic bomb, the ground directly below the explosion was called Ground Zero. In 2001 when the Twin Towers of the World Trade Centers in New York City were struck and collapsed, “Ground Zero” was again given to the ground beneath the towers. However, this time it became the name everyone referred to and that everyone recognized as the place of attack on September 11, 2001.
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*Snippet by: Tiffany
August 24, 2013
Edwin Perkins was the inventor of Kool-Aid. His childhood friend, and eventual wife, introduced him to a powdered dessert mix known as Jell-o. He was intrigued by this. Since he was the son of a General Store owner, he encouraged his father to sell the Jell-o in his store. At a young age he ordered a kit called, “How to Become a Manufacturer.” He developed a concentrated liquid drink mix called Fruit Smack. It was sold and shipped in glass bottles. Water could simply be added to the concentrate to make it a tasty drink at an affordable price. Because of the cost of shipping, Perkins figured out a way to take the liquid out of the mix and sell the concentrate in powdered form which could be shipped in envelopes. Perkins first called these powder packets Kool-Ade and later Kool-Aid and originally sold them for 10 cents. During the Great Depression he cut the cost in half and sold them for only 5 cents. This brought happiness to many young children as it was a special treat that families could still afford.
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*Snippet by: Tiffany
August 23, 2013
Because babies haven’t quite figured out how to use their fingers they use their mouths and tongues to explore. Their tongues and mouths are very well advanced because they use them so often to eat. Their fingers are not yet able to stroke and feel objects making it difficult to explore and understand what different objects are. This is why everything a baby gets his hands on goes straight into his mouth—to learn and figure out new things. Which means you may find your baby licking the hardwood floor or chewing on the crib, or your fingers, clothes, and everything else.
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*Snippet by: Tiffany
August 23, 2013
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